The Royal Institute for the Deaf-mutes

This drawing of the Royal Institute for the Deaf-mutes was part of an illustration made by C. Simonsen for a song written to Anna and Rasmus Malling-Hansen. Anna and Rasmus can be seen on each side of the Institute, and by the position of their hands, it seems they are "speaking" by the means of sign language. Copyright: The Town Museum of Copenhagen

The story of the Institute - written by Rasmus Malling-Hansen in 1872

In it's sixth edition, published in 1872, The Nordic Periodical for the Blind-, Deaf-, and Retarded School contained an article written by Rasmus Malling-Hansen, where he tells the story of The Royal Institute for the Deaf-Mutes, from it's foundation in 1807, up until his own period as the principal of the school. Malling-Hansen, who had been in this position since 1865, had great insight in the topic, and his presentation shows that Denmark was a leading country in the way they organized the teaching of the deaf. The pupils were devided into groups depending on their hearing and spiritual abilities, and given an education based on the methods best suited for their qualifications. For this Malling-Hansen had much of the honour, and throughout the 70's and the 80's he was a leading force in the development of the Danish educational system.

 

 

This picture of the Royal Institute for the Deaf-mutes was printed in the 100 years anniversary book, published in 1907.
A Malling-Hansen portrait probably from the 1870's. Photo: The Royal Library in Copenhagen
Early in the last century The Royal Institute for the Deaf-mutes went through a restauration and extention. The new addition to the one end of the school can be seen on this picture. Copyright: The Royal Library in Copenhagen